Canterbury DHB

Context

Prescribing Instructions for Medicines

In This Section

General Advice

Inpatient Charting

All Outpatient and Discharge Prescriptions

After-Hours Discharge and Community Prescribing

General Advice

  1. Prescription writing and delivery:
  2. Information that must be made known to the patient:
  3. Funding issues:
  4. The patient or caregiver should be confident about the prescribed medicines aided by:
  5. Ensure an accurate and recent record of body weight for children; and round the dose to the nearest practical dose (consider dose form and measurable volumes for oral liquids, i.e. the nearest graduation of an appropriate oral syringe).
  6. Prescriptions should always be clear:

     

    Reason:

     

    10 mg

    10mg

    10mg may look like 100g

     

    2 mg

    2.0 mg

    2.0 mg may look like 20 mg

     

    0.5 mg

    .5 mg

    .5 mg may look like 5 mg

     

    UNIT(S)

    U or u

    U may look like 0

     

    MICROGRAMS

    μg, mcg

    μg may look like mg

     

    ONCE DAILY

    OD, D or QD

    od may look like bd, d may look like 1d (1 dose), qd may look like qid (4 times a day)

     

    NANOGRAM

    ng

    ng could be mistaken for mg

     

    MILLIMOLE or MMOL

    milliequivalent or mEq

    milliequivalent could be confused with millimole

     

    SUBLINGUAL

    SL

    SL could be mistaken for SC

     

    SUBCUT

    SC

    SC could be mistaken for SL

     

    QID

    QDS

    qds could be mistaken for daily

     

    L

    l

    I could be mistaken for 1 (one)

     

    The following Latin and other abbreviations are acceptable:

     

    BD

    = twice daily

    IM

    = intramuscular

     

    Q"X"H

    = every "x" hours

    IV

    = intravenous

     

    PRN

    = as required

    SUBCUT

    = subcutaneously

     

    TDS

    = three times a day

    PO

    = oral

     

    QID

    = four times a day

    PR

    = rectal

     

    MANE

    = in the morning

    TOP

    = topical

     

    NOCTE

    = at night

    INH

    = inhaled

Inpatient Charting

General advice for inpatient prescribing

Electronic prescribing (MedChart)

Enter and/or update adverse drug reactions (Allergies and Intolerances box) on MedChart.

Inpatient Charting - MedChartA.png

Paper drug chart prescribing

Enter and/or update adverse drug reactions (Drug Reactions box) on National Medication Charts.

All Outpatient and Discharge Prescriptions

Discharge prescribing is part of the writing of the discharge summary, in Health Connect South.

See Writing Discharge Summaries – Hints and Tips on Hospital HealthPathways.

  1. Prescription writing and delivery:
  2. Duration or quantity:
  3. Funding issues:
  4. Children:
  5. Rest homes:
  6. Blister packs:
  7. Less commonly prescribed medicines and compounded liquids:
  8. Funding:
  9. Special circumstances:

After-Hours Discharge and Community Prescribing

In addition to the general advice above, contact the patient's community pharmacy:

Funding:

Supply of hospital medicines to take home after hours:

Special circumstances:

Information about this Canterbury DHB document (132290):

Document Owner:

Not assigned (see Who's Who)

Last Updated:

March 2024 (Prescribing Instructions for Medicines)

Next Review Due:

March 2025

Keywords:

Note: Only the electronic version is controlled. Once printed, this is no longer a controlled document.

Topic Code: 132290